STATE OF HAWAII
BOARD OF EDUCATION
STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT COMMITTEE

MINUTES

Queen Liliuokalani Building
1390 Miller Street, Room 404
Honolulu, Hawaii 96813
Tuesday, June 07, 2016

PRESENT:
Patricia Halagao, Chairperson
Jim Williams, Vice Chairperson
Amy Asselbaye
Grant Chun, Esq.
Margaret Cox
Don Horner
Hubert Minn
Brennan Lee (student representative)
Brian De Lima, Esq., ex officio

EXCUSED:
None

ALSO PRESENT:
Stephen Schatz, Deputy Superintendent
Tammi Chun, Assistant Superintendent, Office of Strategy, Innovation, and Performance
Suzanne Mulcahy, Assistant Superintendent, Office of Curriculum, Instruction, and Student Support
Deyon Nagato, Education Specialist, Office of Curriculum, Instruction, and Student Support
Alison Kunishige, Board Executive Director
Kenyon Tam, Board Analyst
Summer Jenkins


I. Call to Order

The Student Achievement Committee (“Committee”) meeting was called to order by Committee Chairperson Patricia Halagao at 8:30 a.m.


II. Public Testimony on Committee Agenda Items

Committee Chairperson Halagao called for public testimony. The following people provided oral testimony.

Name
Organization
Agenda Item
Position
Michael GolojuchDemocratic Party of Hawaii, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender (“LGBT”) CaucusIV. C. Presentation on Department of Education’s work on guidelines relating to transgender students Support
Corey RosenleeHawaii State Teacher AssociationIV. C. Presentation on Department of Education’s work on guidelines relating to transgender students Support
Amy PerussoDepartment of Education IV. C. Presentation on Department of Education’s work on guidelines relating to transgender students Support
Dr. Jennifer SalcedoThe American Congress of Obstetricians and GynecologistsV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Dr. Shanghini RaidooPublicV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose

Written testimony was received and provided to the Committee. The following is a listing of the people that submitted written testimony before the testimony deadline.

Name
Organization
Agenda Item
Position
Judith ClarkHawaii Youth Services NetworkV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Punahele AlconPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Nancy RoemerPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Jessica AgsaldaPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Frank SnowPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Troy AbrahamPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
William EhrhornPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Amy Cook Planned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Bliss KaneshiroPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Joan Levy Planned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Bo BredaPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Gordon Lindsay Planned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Laurel LesliePlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Laurel WhillockPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Barbara HatleyPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Kristina SwensonPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Robert BacherPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Connie Neish Planned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Melissa KirkendallPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Deb SpringPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
David SonnePlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Candace MoorePlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Mara MillerPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Jim CooperPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Nancy KramerPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
David CarrollPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Lorrain AkibaPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Laura BullerPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Lori AdolewskiPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Mary Beth Hilburn Planned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Holly DuanePlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Jacqui SkillPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Stephanie AustinPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Esperanza BravoPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Mark AnselPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Debbie DehmPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Ruth PahinuiPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Andrew Smith Planned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
David SofioPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Fred BonnetPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Aurora LemkePlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Anna EspaniolaPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Scott BowerPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Jack MurphyPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Ddiier FlamentPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Judith WhitePlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Karen DaspitPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Rebecca RankPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Anne FojtasekPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Thomas PinkertPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Steve LegarePlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Julie RiversPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Catherine RuckertPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Dennis StrandPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Olaf GitterPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Sandy MurphyPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Carol CarpenterPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
DJ SakataPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Brenda KwonPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Valerie HollandPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Shevaun BitzigPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Jenn SnyderPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Danielle SpitzPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Jonathan McrobertsPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Dana AbdinoorPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Dougal CrowePlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Alex OshiroPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
David BohnPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Kenneth BuschPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Ashley GandizaPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Ric AndrewsPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Alex VerbovenPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Susanne GabbayPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Angela Treat LyonPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Michael LiebermanPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Dr. Sally ZhenPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Valerie LeePlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Ann MichaudPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Erica YamauchiPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Melinda WoodPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Denise GrayzellPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Jacqueline WritePlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Fran CalvertPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Junedale NishiyamaPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Brenda HerronPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Sasha DavidPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Joan RichPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Amy HePlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Tia PearsonPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Jake & Cynthia JacobsPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Daryl MatthewsPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Kelli GreenPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Patricia BilykPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Robert NergerPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Eve PowersPlanned ParenthoodTestimony on Policy # 2245/103.8 Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Cathy Paxton-HainesPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
B.A. McClintockPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Martha MartinPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Dave KisorPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Cherie King Planned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Mary HeaneyPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Lana Lee Plum Planned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Hugh KeelPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Cherie KingPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Sarah PreblePlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Edwyna SpiegelPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Ronelle MelekaiPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Michael FischerPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Wes StevensPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
R UPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Kimi Ide-FosterPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Pamela FarrisPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Claudio Friederich Planned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Donna WoodPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Jackie PangPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Gary LitePlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Arthur HodgePlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Sheryl GardnerPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Lisa FreuPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Janet Rae Planned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Juliet BegleyPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Janice Palma GlenniePlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Cory HPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Julia McGovernPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
A Gui Planned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Denise ColgrovePlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Sharon LetonPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Noelle MolterPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Cindy LancePlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
C OkinagaPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Janet MishlerPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Sara VisvaderPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Mark RogersPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Juliana KailihiwaPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Namphuong QuachPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Stacey OsbornePlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Brent ChingPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Peter AltomarePlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
David BohnPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Bruce YoungPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Jade McgaffPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Lon PolkPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Dominique SiaPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Wyatt BartlettPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Barbara Kaneshige Planned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Marjorie WatanabePlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Bridget ScottPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Miles KawabataPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Mark GordonPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Stephen BerksonPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Ann-Marie BregePlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Lea MintonPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Paul MeyerPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Erika HahnPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Katherine SullivanPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Sally HartmanPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Zoe KompstPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Alma McgoldrickPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Bryan S.Planned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Kathy ShimataPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Liza BotzPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Gail JacksonPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Henry LeePlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Nancy FindeisenPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Marjorie ErwayPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Eric HaskinsPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Chris SantomauroDepartment TeacherIV. C. Presentation on DOE's work on guidelines relating to transgender studentsSupport
Nan KleiberFirst Unitarian Church of HonoluluV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Shandhini RaidooKapiolani Medical Center for Women and ChildrenV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Lauren GuestKauai District Health OfficeV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Sonia BlackistonCommunity MemberV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Dr. Jennifer SalcedoAmerican College of Obstetricians & GynecologistsV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Laurie FieldPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Cheryl BurghardtPublicIV. A. Update on Board Policy 105.14, Multilingualism for Equitable Education implementation plan & C. Presentation on DOE's work on guidelines relating to transgender studentsComment
Amy PerussoDepartment of EducationV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy E 101, Whole Student DevelopmentComment
Corey RosenleeHawaii State Teachers AssociationIV. C. Presentation on DOE's work on guidelines relating to transgender studentsComment
Arielle ColonPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Pat McManamanPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Myra KongPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Amy MonkPublicV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose
Jade McgaffPlanned ParenthoodV. C. Committee Action on Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsOppose

Michael Golojuch, Democratic Party of Hawaii, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender (“LGBT”) Caucus, testified in support of policies that assist transgender students. Golojuch conveyed full support for the transgender guidelines presented by the Department of Education (“Department”) and was happy to see the guidelines come forward. Golojuch hoped the Board of Education (“Board”) would pass the guidelines in a quick manner and ensure they are fully implemented. Golojuch stated that implementation is key and the guidelines are important to protect both transgender and non-transgender students.

Committee Member Hubert Minn entered at 8:33 a.m.

Corey Rosenlee, President, Hawaii State Teachers Association, testified in support of the transgender guidelines and asked the Committee to recommend adoption. Rosenlee stated that schools must welcome all students and mentioned that transgender issues had surfaced during the year. Rosenlee expressed his support for U.S. President Barack Obama’s stance on transgender issues.

Amy Perusso presented testimony on behalf of Harper Ocaner, a teacher on Maui. Ocaner had witnessed struggles in the LGBT community for 26 years and stated that these students are in need of additional support. Ocaner supported the guidelines and stated that students need to celebrate their identities.

Student Representative Brennan Lee entered at 8:37 a.m.

Dr. Jennifer Salcedo, The American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, testified in opposition to Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public Schools. Her organization supports the availability of condoms to reduce health burdens, unplanned pregnancies, and sexually transmitted infections. Salcedo stated that Hawaii has the lowest rate of condom use, and condoms would allow youth to make better sexual health decisions. Salcedo stated that, working in a teen clinic, she experienced teens dealing with sexually transmitted infections every session. Salcedo strongly supported a change in policy and offered her organization as a resource.

Committee Member Don Horner asked Salcedo if she could provide condom distribution statistics for the rest of the country. Salcedo did not have the statistics but stated that she could provide them at a later time. Committee Member Horner stated that the lowest rate of condom use implies that other states are distributing condoms in schools. Salcedo stated that she was not testifying that school distribution is the sole reason for the low rate of condom use, but that it is more of a supporting factor.

Committee Vice Chairperson Jim Williams asked Salcedo how distribution would work if the policy changed. Salcedo stated that, as a health professional, she believes condoms should be distributed on an individual basis. Committee Vice Chairperson Williams stated that if the policy is to be reversed, there are many things that need to be considered, such as a process for distribution. Salcedo again offered her organization as a resource.

Committee Member Hubert Minn stated that the same topic had been discussed by the Board 30 years ago. Committee Member Minn agreed with Vice Chairperson Williams’ inclination take into consideration the implementation of a policy change.

Dr. Shandhini Raidoo testified in opposition to Board Policy 103.8. Raidoo stated that almost half of students have sex by the time they graduate, and she shared statistics, which were similar to what was provided by the previous testifier. Raidoo stated that in her teen clinic, there are dozens of pregnant students and students with sexually transmitted diseases. In Massachusetts, condom distribution reduced sexual infections by 47%. Raidoo stated that there are a number of different ways to implement a policy change and that prohibiting condoms in schools would not stop students from having sex.



III. Approval of Meeting Minutes of May 3, 2016

ACTION: The Student Achievement Committee meeting minutes of May 3, were approved as circulated unanimously with all members present voting aye (Horner/Williams).

IV. Discussion Items
Suzanne Mulcahy, Assistant Superintendent, Office of Curriculum, Instruction, and Student Support (“OCISS”), and Deyon Nagato, Education Specialist, OCISS, presented themselves to the Committee. Mulcahy stated that the Board passed several policies within the last year, and Board Policy 105.14, Multilingualism for Equitable Education (“Multilingualism Policy”), brought the suite of policies together. Mulcahy stated that implementation will help students from foreign countries learning English and English-speaking students wishing to learn another language. The goal is to implement a plan that would encompass the work of OCISS and help principals to embrace all students.

Nagato began by displaying a diagram of policies focused on students and families. The diagram was previously presented to the Committee but had since been altered to include the rights of deaf students. Nagato acknowledged the timeframe of the implementation plan was extended in response to a request from principals. A workgroup was organized to gather data and perspectives. Nagato led the workgroup partnering with representatives from the Board, Kapiolani Community College, Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages, Pacific Resources for Education and Learning, and the University of Hawaii College of Education. The Multilingualism Policy was introduced to the Teacher Education Coordinating Committee and will be presented to Department administrators in July and educators in September. The workgroup will share data on teachers and students and allow staff to give input and the readiness for next priority actions. The Multilingualism Policy will provide programs to students, training for teachers, and outreach to families. The workgroup will engage communities through Fall 2016 and will create an implementation plan to share with the public.

Nagato stated that the Multilingualism Policy began with students in mind and supports their multilingual identities. The Department is identifying instructional approaches and would finalize the role of an advisory committee in the summer to represent everyone and enhance infrastructure. Nagato stated that data and analysis would be completed by the upcoming fall, and implementation goals would be identified, as well as potential partners. The goals would be shared with Department stakeholders for formal input. In spring 2017, the advisory committee would be established, and its first meeting would be held in April 2017. These goals would provide supports for language development. The Department also plans to seek funding for permanent world language specialist positions. In the meantime, the Department continues creating and maintaining a website for multilingualism information and options to maximize access and resources.

Committee Member Minn referred to the timeline and asked how the Multilingualism Policy fits into the Every Student Succeeds Act (“ESSA”) plan with English Learners in terms of English Language Arts. Mulcahy responded that English Language Arts is an umbrella and English Learners are within it. Mulcahy stated that educators are flexible; the Department will have to adjust according to how the ESSA plan is developed.

Committee Chairperson Halagao stated that best practices should be reviewed, and home languages could be included. Committee Chairperson Halagao stated that Hawaii is building the system and planting the idea in schools to create opportunities down the line.

Committee Vice Chairperson Williams mentioned previous testimony claiming that the implementation of the Multilingualism Policy is heavily skewed toward secondary education and clarified that elementary teachers have as many multilingual students as secondary teachers. Committee Vice Chairperson Williams asked if the implementation plan would encompass the entire K-12 spectrum. Nagato confirmed that it would and stated that the Department is looking at teacher qualifications for all grades. Committee Vice Chairperson Williams stated that any class that has a child that speaks another language is a multilingual classroom, but there cannot be separate programs for every child. He asked if the Department is developing comprehensive supports for teachers. Nagato replied that teacher training and resources would be available and inclusive of grades K-12. Committee Vice Chairperson Williams stated that the Department needs to prepare to seek funding for implementation quickly because of the timing of the biennium budget request or else the required funding will be two years behind. Mulcahy replied that OCISS is seeking funding now. Committee Vice Chairperson Williams stated that funding is two years out, but there are still teachers and students that need support now. There should be concurrent efforts to implement the policy while providing the supports the Department can now.

Mulcahy and Lauren Kaupp, Education Specialist, OCISS, provided an update on the implementation of NGSS.

Kaupp stated that since February 10, 2016, she has traveled with Rosanna Fukuda, Social Studies Coordinator, to present the NGSS framework to Department employees. There have been sessions across the state reaching over 300 staff. The Department has officially begun working with the NGSS network of states that have adopted the standards and participated in national meetings for implementation. The effort has been cooperative between the state, complex areas, and schools, and has involved multiple offices in the Department, including the Assessment and Accountability Branch, Communications and Community Affairs Office, Office of School Facilities and Support Services, and OCISS.

Committee Member Amy Asselbaye arrived at 9:04 a.m.

An implementation reflection tool had been developed and shared for feedback. Kaupp stated that there is a wide range of interested organizations and reiterated that the goal is to provide students with opportunities in science education. Kaupp stated there is a need to facilitate communication to inform an implementation plan, but that The Hope Street Group surveyed teachers find out what resources they need to implement the standards. The Department is working towards full implementation by the 2019-2020 school year. Kaupp stated that implementation is a general progression, and various schools are at different stages in the process. Kaupp added that OCISS needs to provide consultations, flexibility, and support for implementation. Kaupp stated that the Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (“STEM”) Kick Start program would provide experiences and support for schools to build familiarity with NGSS. Many schools already have a head start on implementation by integrating STEM programs into curriculum. Kaupp stated that teachers and students are familiar at different levels, and some schools have already begun looking into the NGSS transition. For example, Waimea Canyon Elementary has begun realigning coursework and is ahead of the curve. Kaupp stated that she had previously shared information on six main areas of implementation, including standards alignment, curriculum and instruction, assessment, professional development, cross-content connections, and communication. Kaupp had since then aligned the main areas with milestones. The milestones include NGSS adoption in Spring 2016, materials to be reviewed for recommendation in the 2017-2018 school year, new authorized courses and code numbers linked with new report cards in place between summer and fall of 2018, and transitioning assessments in Spring 2020 for full implementation.

Mulcahy stated that the Department would use what they had learned from implementation of Common Core State Standards to improve the process for NGSS. For example, Common Core State Standard implementation was done by certain grade levels in certain years starting with non-tested grades. NGSS would instead allow schools a three-year grace period to implement when they are ready and giving them the opportunity to determine what is best for their students and school. Some schools are prepared to implement while others need more time.

Kaupp added that a tool for reflection was created with six or seven goal areas to help with implementation. The tool is intended to see where schools stand and where they need to go. Moving forward, the Department is gearing up to share the implementation framework at the upcoming Educational Leadership Institute and Leadership Symposium and planning to provide multiple forms of professional development and communication.

Committee Member Minn asked if teachers would receive credit for NGSS-related professional development to help with pay scales. Mulcahy responded that credit is a possibility if a course is created and approved by the Office of Human Resources.

Committee Member Margaret Cox asked if secondary schools would head in the direction of standards-based report cards. Mulcahy replied that there is a pilot group of four principals interested in moving ahead with standards-based report cards for secondary schools. Mulcahy indicated that they are targeting implementation of the standards-based report card for all secondary schools in 2020. Committee Member Cox stated that students and parents do not understand the differences between grading in elementary and middle school, so there is confusion when students receive a “D” on their middle school report card. There needs to be consistency between grading in elementary and middle schools. Committee Member Cox stated that problem needs to be analyzed because students and parents often do not understand transitional changes and that science is just one piece of this.

Committee Vice Chairperson Williams stated that if the Board and Department are more aggressive about pursuing competency-based education, then alignment of report cards would be a natural outgrowth.

Ex Officio Committee Member Brian De Lima referred to the reflection tool and asked if there are any particular complexes that appear further along than others. Kaupp replied that the tool has not been shared widely yet, but distribution seems to be even across the state. Ex Officio Committee Member De Lima stated that 26 states have adopted NGSS, and he believed it is a good concept. Ex Officio Committee Member De Lima explained that he wants the community to understand the “why” and “how” of NGSS so as to get ahead of false criticisms seen with Common Core State Standards. Kaupp stated that Hawaii is the eighteenth state to adopt NGSS, and the standards are growing organically.

Ex Officio Committee Member De Lima stated that if high standards are set, students will excel. He asked if there are inclusion-based modifications built within NGSS. Mulcahy stated that inclusion modifications are not part of the standards but is up to the teacher to build in as part of the teacher’s set of instructional tools.

Ex Officio Committee Member De Lima expressed concern about how struggling students would be helped. Ex Officio Committee Member De Lima stated that one-third of the student population is struggling, and when adopting standards is being discussed, part of the discussion should be about how that third of the student population will be supported to meet those standards. Mulcahy stated that she would continue to focus on helping struggling students. Mulcahy stated that schools need to come together to support all students.

Committee Member Minn asked if there is a target timeline for implementation to keep the Department on track. Kaupp replied that the idea is to have implementation milestones in place and communicate with schools and provide supports to reach the milestones. Kaupp stated that full implementation is intended to be complete by the 2019-2020 school year.

Student Representative Brennan Lee introduced Andrea Lyn Mateo, incoming Student Representative, to the Committee. Mateo is an upcoming senior at Waipahu High School who will be attending a program at Princeton University over the summer and returning to serve on the Board as of August 6, 2016.

Stephen Schatz, Deputy Superintendent, presented the guidelines relating to transgender students and believed they reflected the values of the public education system. Schatz mentioned Waianae High and Farrington High as schools successfully showing inclusiveness through the interaction between students and teachers. Schatz stated that Board Policy E-3, Nā Hopena A‘o (HĀ), aligns with what the Department is trying to accomplish with the guidelines: inclusiveness and acceptance for all students. Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender youth experience bullying in schools throughout the nation and discrimination has often led to depression, chronic absenteeism, suicide attempts, and other negative behavior. Schatz stated the development of the guidelines was a collaborative effort involving input from internal and external stakeholders. Schatz stated the guidelines are fluid with the possibility of changing moving forward. Schatz first reviewed the definitions of key terms, such as “transgender,” “sex,” “assigned sex at birth,” and “gender.” The guidelines apply to all transgender students, including those entering school as transgender or transitioning during their school experience. Schatz listed legal parameters relating to the guidelines, including Board Policy 305.10 (Anti-Harassment, Anti-Bullying, and Anti-Discrimination Against Student(s) by Employees), Hawaii Revised Statutes Chapter 489 (Discrimination in Public Accommodations), Title IX of the federal Education Amendments Act of 1972, and Title IV of the federal Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Schatz shared the proposed guidelines:

Schatz stated the Department had received a great deal of feedback regarding to the competitive athletics guidelines and is reviewing comments from the Department of the Attorney General and other federal guidance. Schatz stated jurisdictions have different approaches to the guidelines, and the Department will continue to research the most appropriate approach to balance competitive fairness and inclusivity.

Schatz stated an implementation plan for the guidelines is still a work in progress. Department will set up meetings in the near future to determine how all Department employees will be trained. The distinction between official and unofficial records needs to be made clearer as well. Schatz stated that facilities issues in terms of how they are used, built, and retrofitted, will need to be considered moving forward.

Student Representative Lee shared that the Hawaii State Student Council (“HSSC”) discussed transgender student issues at a previous HSSC meeting. Media publication of transgender issues gave students a larger context to pull from and students are more open than in prior years. Lee stated that students expressed issues with accommodating transgender students and felt that equal education and accommodation for all students is important. Lee shared concerns about identifying the difference between consistently transgender students and confused students and stated that gender identification and sexual orientation are separate.

Committee Member Cox stated that the Department is on the right track and hoped the community will keep an open mind about how things will be implemented at the school level. Board Member Cox stated that training will be extremely important, and the Department needs to ensure all students are treated fairly and have access to the education they need.

Committee Member Horner asked if the involvement of parents is optional and if parents have any rights in the process. Board Member Horner stated that there is a difference between an elementary student and high school student transitioning and asked how communication between the school and home would be handled each situation.

Schatz explained that the guidelines do not prohibit inclusion of the parents and clarified that the parent may or may not be involved. The school may not initially communicate with the parent but may involve them at a later time. Schatz stated that the examples of transitions Committee Member Horner provided are different situations which would be handled differently. Siobhan Ng, Acting Chief of Staff to the Superintendent stated that parent notification and inclusion has been an issue because of student privacy. Schatz added that the Department would take the feedback received at the meeting and take another look at the guidelines. The issue of the difference between elementary and secondary school students is something that is found in many situations, not just parent notification and involvement.

Committee Member Horner asked who the decision maker is in regards to determining a student’s “sincerely-held gender identity” at the school level. Schatz replied that it would depend on the structure of the school and how it would deal with the situation.

Committee Member Horner referred to the mandatory quarterly meetings between transgender students and counselors and asked where the resources for these meetings would come from. Schatz stated that those meetings are not intended to be mandatory.

Ex Officio Committee Member De Lima stated that parents should be involved and advised, and the Board has an ends policy that requires that. Ex Officio Committee Member De Lima further stated that state law makes parents responsible for their children unless they are determined to be unfit. Ex Officio Member De Lima expressed concern with the counselor quarterly meetings and stated that it may be burdensome or intimidating for a student to be required to check in every quarter. Ex Officio Committee Member De Lima stated the issues being discussed will need to be dealt with at the school level.

Committee Member Amy Asselbaye referred to parental involvement concerns and shared that state law allows children over the age of 13 to seek and receive medical care without parental knowledge or consent.

Committee Member Asselbaye asked if there is anything regarding competitive sports in high school athletics. Schatz explained that it is a complicated issue with multiple leagues involved. Schatz stated that the practice had been according to assigned sex at birth, but careful discussions are underway to make the right decision.

Committee Member Minn referred to athletics and shared his experience implementing Title IX. Committee Member Minn stated that training for coaches is important and requested that Schatz get input from students as well.

Committee Member Horner asked if the student needs to have a plan before accessing the restroom. Schatz replied that no plan is required. Committee Member Horner asked if any student can use any restroom. Schatz replied that students may only use the restroom that fits their sincerely-held belief of their gender identity.

Committee Member Minn agreed with Committee Member Horner’s point and stated that while a plan may not be necessary, schools need to have a plan or procedures for how to address these situations and confirm that students are in the right area.

Committee Member Cox stated that the guidelines need work and will need to be in place by the time the following school year begins. Committee Member Cox stated that principals need firm plans at the beginning of the year to prepare faculty and suggested refining some of the procedures.

Committee Vice Chairperson Williams shared concern with the quarterly meetings and stated that meeting once or twice a year may be more appropriate. Committee Vice Chairperson Williams suggested researching Committee Member Asselbaye’s legal reference as to the cut-off age for parental knowledge and consent on medical care and developing a similar process for parental communication. Committee Vice Chairperson Williams stated that the guidelines represent a humane approach.

Committee Chairperson Halagao stated the Department is generally moving in a positive direction. Committee Chairperson Halagao stated that it is important to continue community partnerships and keep the guidelines specific to Hawaii.

V. Recommendation for Action
Danny Vasconcellos, Organizational Performance Manager, State Public Charter School Commission (“Commission”), provided background information on charter school requests for waivers from graduation requirements. Vasconcellos stated that charter schools are required to follow certain policies set by the Board, including Board Policy 104.1 relating to graduation requirements. The current charter school contracts, which expire in 2017, have graduation requirements applying to next year’s seniors. Vasconcellos stated that 20 of 34 charters provide a high school program, and the majority of them follow Board-established graduation requirements. Courses are often titled and structured differently, so authorized courses and code numbers are used to make sure corresponding numbers exist to transfer students throughout the school system and to higher education institutions.

John Kim, Commissioner, reviewed the Commission’s recommendation regarding Hakipu‘u Learning Center’s (“HLC”) waiver request. Kim stated that the Commission could not recommend that the waiver be approved. The Commission could not tell what is considered a credit or determine if teachers granting credits are licensed. Kim stated that HLC’s credit hours could not be matched to state credit hours and did not provide qualifications for mastery. The Commission could not recommended approval due to undefined credit hours.

Committee Member De Lima left at 10:46 a.m.

Charlene Hoe, Assessment Coordinator, HLC, provided background information on HLC. HLC offers a student-centered component and looks at each student individually. Hoe stated that the history of each child is reviewed for placement and a personal learning plan is developed to help students reach graduation requirements. Hoe reviewed the school requirement comparisons. Students are required to earn 10 credits per year from one grade to another. The process is student driven and encourages participants to build their own learning path. Hoe explained that 100 hours of documented time earned one credit. Actions during this time are recorded and entered to determine mastery. Students design their own projects and must have them approved and evaluated before executing. For an approved project, the student will do research, execute papers, design a model, and complete the project to present to the educational team. The team will then determine if the student can defend their knowledge. Full credit is not received from one project; a credit is earned over time. Hoe presented a roster of the school’s current staff members that are certified as highly qualified through the required dates. The only area lacking a certified teacher is math; however, the Department had allowed for an online course to address this requirement. Hoe stated that the Department uses the Carnige unit as a credit, which equals 120 hours a year in class. HLC students are required to earn 100 hours working towards projects, not seat time, for a credit. HLC looked at national models for student-centered, project-based learning and adopted the model to allow students to earn 10 credits per year. A proportional distribution of credits in comparison to Department requirements is applied. The senior project requires at least 300 hours of work, including 50 hours of community service. Students are assessed when they enter the school and move up by demonstrating mastery. Hoe provided a table with student demographics and stated that all points are assessed when students are analyzed. HLC reviews where students are struggling and helps build specific skills for them. Hoe stated that the school struggled with math and reading scores; however, the school services many special education students. Hoe stated that students enter HLC when they are either not succeeding or being held back in other schools. HLC is active in its partnership with Windward Community College and allows students to participate in the Running Start program. The 2016 graduates all had plans beyond school, and many were accepted into multiple colleges. Hoe stated that the school wants to utilize project-based learning and the elements of understanding the cultural continuum of Hawaii’s past, present, and future.

Committee Vice Chairperson Williams asked if Hoe presented the same information to the Commission. Hoe clarified that that all of the data was presented to the Commission with the exception of one teacher’s highly qualified certification and some academic data. Committee Vice Chairperson Williams noted that the graduation requirements table was modified from what the Commission provided. Hoe stated that it is what the school provided to the Commission.

Committee Vice Chairperson Williams asked Hoe what graduation requirements HLC’s recent graduates fulfilled. Hoe replied that the graduates completed a senior project, as well as ten credits a year. Committee Vice Chairperson Williams asked Hoe to clarify whether the students completed more credits than what the Board policy requires. Hoe explained that HLC has used the same graduation requirements since 2006. The model selected is student- and project-based learning, but the credits are shown to align with Board requirements.

Committee Member Asselbaye asked why HLC needs the waiver at this point if the requirements have been used since 2006. Hoe explained that the Department had updated the graduation requirements, and the State Public Charter School Contract (“Charter Contract”) requires the school to follow the Board’s graduation requirements and request a waiver if there are any differences between the school’s requirements and the Board’s. Committee Member Asselbaye asked if the program has been the same since 2006. Hoe confirmed. Committee Member Asselbaye expressed concern that HLC’s approach was rejected by the Commission and felt that charter schools are meant to be different. Committee Member Asselbaye stated that the teacher certification has been addressed and asked what the school would do if the waiver was denied. Hoe replied that the school is different and was designed by the community to engage learners. Hoe stated that if the school’s waiver is not approved, the school will close.

Committee Member Asselbaye asked about the process of denying a charter school’s waiver request. Vasconcellos stated that the Commission will have to work with the school to see what actions could be taken. Vasconcellos stated that HLC has been around for a long time, and the Commission wants to work with the school to meet Board requirements. Committee Member Asselbaye asked if the Charter Contract has a timeframe that allows for assistance. Vasconcellos replied that there will have to be collaboration before the start of the school year. Hoe stated that the disagreement between the Commission and HLC regarding graduation requirements is apparent.

Committee Member Horner stated he supports flexibility but is an advocate for performance. Committee Member Horner asked Hoe to explain HLC’s low scores. Hoe described the challenging student population, which includes high percentages of high-needs students who are eligible for free and reduced lunch and who are in special education programs. Also, many students entering the school are below grade level. Hoe stated that the school’s graduation rate is 70%; however, the graduation rate was reported as 21%, and HLC was unable to appeal the data. Six out of seven students graduated in 2016, and the student who did not graduate was in a special education program. Committee Member Horner acknowledged that the school is accredited and asked how the school has a deficit cash flow of $65,000. Hoe responded that the school received $8,000 per pupil a few years ago and has partners to help financially.

Committee Member Minn asked for elaboration on the comparison of classroom hours. Hoe explained that courses in the Department require 120 hours of in-class seat time, but HLC uses 100 hours of documented learning.

Committee Member Minn asked the Commission what it is looking for in terms of mastery. Cindy Henry, Educational Specialist, Commission, stated that as a priority school, HLC received extra funding for struggling students. Henry added it was not clear how high school credit is awarded to students according to high school level standards for mastery. Hoe responded that the school uses the developmental level as a starting point and rubrics meant for different levels of writing and content. Rubrics are used for guidance and evaluation. Committee Member Minn stated he has difficulty accepting the recommendation and felt that it is wrong to question the methods after years of practice.

Committee Member Grant Chun asked if the issue is the number of hours required to determine mastery or if it was the student-based learning. Henry stated that based on the school’s priority status, growth of the school, and achievement scores, the model is not working for struggling students. Henry stated that the issue is how the credits are awarded based on the rubrics. Henry added that there is a lack of connection and system supports for struggling students. Committee Member Chun asked if the request is accurately presented in the attachment to the Commission’s memorandum. Vasconcellos replied that the attachment is the proposal provided by the school. Committee Member Chun stated that the issue being considered here is not the merit of project-based learning and that the Committee keep the request in context.

Committee Chairperson Halagao stated that the Commission is concerned that there is insufficient evidence regarding teacher certification and asked how the list of highly qualified teachers do not meet the standards. Vasconcellos stated that the charter contract requires charter school teachers to meet the highly qualified status with certifications in their content area. Initially, the Commission did not see certifications in the specific content areas teachers are teaching. For example, there is no certified teacher for math. Vasconcellos stated that credits are being awarded to students by teachers that are not certified in those areas. The new document provided to the Board by HLC at this meeting had not been provided to the Commission.

Committee Vice Chairperson Williams stated that HLC is a priority school, but that does not mean it should not be allowed to grant high school diplomas. Committee Vice Chairperson Williams stated that the Commission was not provided certain information, but HLC has provided the Committee with updated information. Committee Vice Chairperson Williams stated the school is not lowering the bar for graduation requirements and stated that the credit requirements provided by HLC show higher standards than what is required under Board policy. There is a legitimate concern regarding credit equivalency, but in a worst case scenario where an HLC credit is worth less than a DOE credit, the school still requires more credits.

Committee Member Horner agreed but could not vote to override the Commission’s recommendation and grant the school’s request instead of remanding it back to the Commission. Committee Member Horner also agreed with Kim about the value of diplomas and wanted to make sure the process is done correctly.

Committee Chairperson Halagao stated that there should be further conversations between the Commission and school.

ACTION: Motion to approve the Hakipu‘u Learning Center request for waiver from Board Policy 104.1, Graduation and Related, as described in Attachment 2 of the Commission’s memorandum dated May 31, 2016 (Williams/Cox). The motion carried with members Asselbaye, Cox, Minn, and Williams voting aye, and members Halagao, Chun and Horner voting nay.

Vasconcellos gave a brief background on Hawaii Technology Academy and stated that the Commission recommends approval of the waiver request. The request does not change the amount of credits required. The request moves a Social Studies elective and makes two other required courses full credit.

ACTION: Motion to approve the Hawaii Technology Academy request for waiver from Board Policy 104.1, Graduation and Related, as described in the Commission’s memorandum dated May 27, 2016 (Horner/Williams). The motion carried unanimously with all members present voting aye.

Vasconcellos stated that the Commission supports Kanu o ka ‘Āina New Century Public Charter School’s (“KANU”) request for waiver. The waiver request is for an additional credit to make Algebra II a requirement.

Allyson Tamura, Elementary School Head of KANU, spoke on behalf of Mahina Paishon Duarte, Secondary School Head of KANU, and briefly described the school’s mission statement and evolution. Tamura stated that KANU has worked hard to build a reputation as a secondary program and is recognized for producing graduates that are ready for college and to serve the community. KANU wants to require an additional year of math to help with the achievement gap and preparedness for college-level math.

Committee Vice Chairperson Williams asked why the school is requesting an additional credit. Tamura explained that as a small school, KANU could not have multiple courses running through one time block. The school has no extra resources for electives.

ACTION: Motion to approve the Kanu o ka ‘Āina New Century Public Charter School request for waiver from Board Policy 104.1, Graduation and Related, as described in the Commission’s memorandum dated May 27, 2016 (Horner/Williams). The motion carried unanimously with all members present voting aye.

Tammi Chun, Assistant Superintendent, Office of Strategy, Innovation, and Performance, explained that there are a few policies remaining under the old system. Chun recommended keeping the content and renumbering the three policies listed.

Committee Member Cox asked if there were any changes to the Middle Level Education policy. Chun replied that the proposal is to keep the old policy and renumber it.

ACTION: Motion to renumber the above listed policies as stated in the Department’s memorandum dated June 7, 2016 (Williams/Horner). The motion carried unanimously with all members voting aye.

Chun provided a brief presentation on each policy and stated that a full explanation for the Department’s recommendations regarding the Board’s policies is contained in its memoranda on the policies. After the Department’s presentation on each policy, the Committee deliberated on each policy individually. The policy, motion, and vote on each policy are noted in the chart below. Any discussion regarding the policies is included below the chart. Policies with further discussion are noted with an asterisk.

PolicyPolicy TitleAction
E-1Philosophy of Education Hawaii’s Public SchoolsRecommend that the Board adopt Board Policy E-1, Philosophy of Education Hawaii’s Public Schools, with the revisions developed by the Board’s Permitted Interaction Group and the Department, as described in Exhibit B of the submittal dated June 7, 2016 (Williams/Horner). The motion carried unanimously with all members present voting aye.
E-2*Mission, Vision, ValuesRecommend that the Board adopt Board Policy E-2, Mission, Vision, Values, with the revisions developed by the Board’s Permitted Interaction Group and the Department, as described in Exhibit B of the submittal dated June 7, 2016 (Williams/Horner). The motion carried with members Halagao, Chun, Horner, Minn, and Williams voting aye and Cox voting nay.
E-100Student SuccessRecommend that the Board adopt Board Policy E-100, Student Success, with the revisions developed by the Board’s Permitted Interaction Group and the Department, as described in Exhibit B of the submittal dated June 7, 2016 (Williams/Horner). The motion carried unanimously with all members present voting aye.
E-101*Whole Student DevelopmentRecommend that the Board adopt Board Policy E-101, Whole Student Development, with the revisions developed by the Board’s Permitted Interaction Group and the Department, as described in Exhibit A of the submittal dated June 7, 2016 (Williams/Halagao). The motion carried unanimously with all members present voting aye.
*New Sports PolicyRecommend that the Board adopt Board Policy 101.16, High School Athletics, with the revisions developed by the Board’s Permitted Interaction Group and the Department, as described in Exhibit A of the submittal dated June 7, 2016 and the deletion of the last sentence in the second to the last paragraph (Williams/Asselbaye). The motion carried unanimously with all members present voting aye.
E-102Academic Mastery and AssessmentRecommend that the Board adopt Board Policy E-102, Academic Mastery and Assessment, with the revisions developed by the Board’s Permitted Interaction Group and the Department, as described in Exhibit A of the submittal dated June 7, 2016 (Williams/Chun). The motion carried unanimously with all members present voting aye.
E-103Health and WellnessRecommend that the Board adopt Board Policy E-103, Health and Wellness, with the revisions developed by the Board’s Permitted Interaction Group and the Department, as described in Exhibit A of the submittal dated June 7, 2016 (Williams/Chun). The motion carried unanimously with all members present voting aye.
103.1*Health and WellnessRecommend that the Board adopt Board Policy 103.1, Health and Wellness, as described in Exhibit 3 of the Board Member Asselbaye’s memorandum dated June 7, 2016 (Asselbaye/Chun). The motion carried unanimously with all members present voting aye.
103.8*Prophylactics in the Public SchoolsRecommend that the Board adopt Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public Schools, with the revisions developed by the Board’s Permitted Interaction Group and the Department, as described in Exhibit B of the submittal dated June 7, 2016 (Asselbaye/Williams). The motion carried with members Asselbaye, Chun, Cox, Halagao and Williams voting aye and Horner and Minn abstaining.
E-104Graduates Ready for Life/Lifelong LearnersNo action was taken due to redundancy with E-102. Policy not adopted.
E-105Broad-based CurriculumRecommend that the Board adopt Board Policy E-105, Well Rounded Academic Program, with the revisions developed by the Board’s Permitted Interaction Group and the Department, as described in Exhibit A of the submittal dated June 7, 2016 (Williams/Horner). The motion carried unanimously with all members present voting aye.
E-106Supports for Effective LearningRecommend that the Board adopt Board Policy E-106, Supports for Effective Learning, with the revisions developed by the Board’s Permitted Interaction Group and the Department, as described in Exhibit A of the submittal dated June 7, 2016 (Horner/Williams). The motion carried unanimously with all members present voting aye.

Policy E-2, Mission, Vision, Values
Chun stated that the Department worked to review and revise the Board’s Policy Audit Permitted Interaction Group’s (“Policy Audit Group”) edits to the policy to align with the Department and Board Joint Strategic Plan (“Strategic Plan”).

Committee Member Cox expressed concern with the operational aspect of the policy and stated it is too detailed.

Committee Vice Chairperson Williams reminded the Committee that the Board generally focuses on the means policies. Committee Vice Chairperson Williams added that this particular ends policy is taken from the Strategic Plan and therefore is not codifying anything new.

Committee Member Cox stated the Board and Department are working on a new Strategic Plan in efforts for change. Committee Member Cox stated she was displeased that the material was released so close to the Committee’s meeting, giving Committee members little time to review it.

Policy E-101, Whole Student Development
Committee Vice Chairperson Williams stated that the revisions from the Policy Audit Group were meant to move the policy in a direction of general intent.

Chun noted that there had been testimony suggesting the use of the term “whole child” versus “whole student.” Committee Chairperson Halagao stated that both terms convey the same spirit.

New Sports Policy
Committee Member Horner asked Chun to clarify what changes the new policy would make. Chun replied that the policy would codify what the Department is already doing and provide a general recognition with no impact to schools.

Committee Vice Chairperson Williams provided further clarification by explaining that the Policy Audit Group drafted a broad sports policy that included the surfing policy, but the Department recommended that the surfing policy be retained as a separate policy.

Ex Officio Committee Member De Lima left at 12:28 p.m.

Policy 103.1, Health and Wellness
Committee Member Asselbaye stated there had been collaborative subsequent work on the policy’s language with Department representatives. The policy needed additional reporting and accountability. Committee Member Asselbaye explained that the guidelines requirements in the policy are to increase public awareness, support student health, receive annual reports, and identify a committee for accountability.

Committee Member Cox restated her concern with the operational aspect of an overly detailed policy. Committee Member Asselbaye replied that she kept implementation versus policy in mind. Committee Member Asselbaye stated that part of the policy is driven by federal requirements, and it is quite broad in comparison to the guidelines.

Dann Carlson, Assistant Superintendent, Office of School Facilities and Support Services, stated that the Department’s goal was to generalize the policy without putting additional burden schools.

Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public Schools
Committee Chairperson Halagao stated that there is a previously tabled motion on the floor to delete the policy.

Committee Vice Chairperson Williams spoke against the motion to delete the policy and suggested defeating the motion to discuss other possibilities. Committee Vice Chairperson Williams stated that the Policy Audit Group’s suggestions were intended to merely put language in place.

Committee Chairperson Halagao called the question on the motion to delete Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public Schools, made at the April 7, 2015 Committee meeting (Budd/Asselbaye). The motion failed with all members voting nay.

Committee Member Horner made a motion to recommend that the Board adopt Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public Schools, with the revisions developed by the Board’s Policy Audit Group and the Department, as described in Exhibit B of the submittal dated June 7, 2016. Committee Vice Chairperson Williams seconded.

Committee Member Asselbaye made a motion to amend the main motion to recommend that the Board instruct the Department to discuss and consider possible amendments to Board Policy 103.8 when obtaining feedback regarding the implementation plan for new Board Policy 103.4, School Health Services. Committee Vice Chairperson Williams seconded.

Committee Member Asselbaye stated that not much feedback had occurred, and there is a need for consensus and understanding. Committee Member Asselbaye mentioned the testimony previously given and stated that there is more information to be researched and reviewed.

Ex Officio Committee Member De Lima returned at 12:45 p.m.

Committee Vice Chairperson Williams stated that the subject needs to be addressed, and he supports a policy implementation plan.

Committee Member Horner stated that the question is where the line is drawn between school and health.

Committee Member Asselbaye stated that the whole issue will be considered in the context of implementation of Board Policy 103.4, School Health Services.

Ex Officio Committee Member De Lima stated that the sexual education policy also spoke to the need of implementation, and abstinence is still an aspect. Ex Officio Committee Member De Lima stated that the policy should also be considered in the Department’s review.

ACTION: Motion to amend main motion to include instructions to the Department to include discussion of possible amendments to Board Policy 103.8 when obtaining feedback regarding the implementation plan for new Board Policy 103.4, School Health Services, taking into specific consideration (1) the public testimony submitted on Board Policy 103.8, (2) the needs of students and school level staff and faculty, and (3) increasing the provision of health care services to students. Also, to instruct the Department to report back to the Board regarding any proposed amendments to Board Policy 103.8 when Board Policy 103.4 implementation is next on the Board agenda (Asselbaye/Williams). The motion carried with members Asselbaye, Chun, Cox, Halagao and Williams voting aye and Horner and Minn abstaining.

ACTION: Main motion to recommend that the Board adopt Board Policy 103.8, Prophylactics in the Public Schools, with the revisions developed by the Board’s Policy Audit Group and the Department, as described in Exhibit B of the submittal dated June 7, 2016, and instruct the Department to include discussion of possible amendments to Board Policy 103.8 when obtaining feedback regarding the implementation plan for new Board Policy 103.4, School Health Services, taking into specific consideration (1) the public testimony submitted on Board Policy 103.8, (2) the needs of students and school level staff and faculty, and (3) increasing the provision of health care services to students. Also, to instruct the Department to report back to the Board regarding any proposed amendments to Board Policy 103.8 when Board Policy 103.4 implementation is next on the Board agenda. The motion carried with members Asselbaye, Chun, Cox, and Williams voting aye and Horner and Minn abstaining.

Chun stated that the meeting concluded the Department’s policy audit work.

VI. Adjournment

Committee Chairperson Halagao adjourned the meeting at 1:00 p.m.