FINAL

STATE OF HAWAII
BOARD OF EDUCATION
GENERAL BUSINESS MEETING

MINUTES

Queen Liliuokalani Building
1390 Miller Street, Room 404
Honolulu, Hawaii 96813
Tuesday, September 6, 2016
1:30 p.m.


PRESENT:
Lance Mizumoto, Chairperson
Brian De Lima, Esq., Vice Chairperson
Patricia Bergin
Grant Chun, Esq.
Margaret Cox
Hubert Minn
Kenneth Uemura
Bruce Voss
Colonel Peter Santa Ana (military representative)

EXCUSED:
Jim Williams
Andrea Lyn Mateo (student representative)

ALSO PRESENT:
Kathryn Matayoshi, Superintendent
Stephen Schatz, Deputy Superintendent
Rodney Luke, Pearl City-Waipahu Complex Area Superintendent
Keith Hayashi, Waipahu High School Principal
Alison Kunishige, Board Executive Director
Kenyon Tam, Board Analyst
Summer Jenkins


I. Call to Order

The Board of Education (“Board”) General Business Meeting was called to order by Board Chairperson Lance Mizumoto at 1:30 p.m.


II. Public Testimony on Board of Education (“Board”) Agenda Items

Chairperson Mizumoto called for public testimony. The following people provided oral testimony.

Name
Organization
Agenda Item
Position
Karen LeeHawaii P-20 VII. B. Board Action on Human Resources Committee recommendation concerning Superintendent’s 2015-2016 School Year evaluation.Support
Alex HarrisHarold K. L. Castle FoundationVII. B. Board Action on Human Resources Committee recommendation concerning Superintendent’s 2015-2016 School Year evaluation.Support
Andy JonesDepartment of Education
(Radford High School)
IV. A. SAC Report on: (1) standards-based education, including statewide assessmentComment
Vicky Parker KamDepartment of Education (Ilima Intermediate)IV. A. SAC Report on: (1) standards-based education, including statewide assessmentComment
Lisa MorrisonDepartment of Education (Maui Waena Intermediate)IV. A. SAC Report on: (1) standards-based education, including statewide assessmentComment
Jessica WhitsettCommunity memberIV. A. SAC Report on: (1) standards-based education, including statewide assessmentComment
Michal NowiskiUniversity Laboratory SchoolIV. A. SAC Report on: (1) standards-based education, including statewide assessmentComment
Mireille EllsworthDepartment of Education
(Waiakea High School)
IV. A. SAC Report on: (1) standards-based education, including statewide assessmentComment
Amy Perruso Department of Education (Mililani High School)IV. A. SAC Report on: (1) standards-based education, including statewide assessmentComment
Mitzie HigaDepartment of Education (Ewa Makai)IV. A. SAC Report on: (1) standards-based education, including statewide assessmentComment
Kris Coffield IMUA AllianceIV. A. SAC Report on: (1) standards-based education, including statewide assessmentComment
Vanessa Ott Community memberIV. B. Reports on Board Community MeetingsComment
Kau‘i SangParentVII. B. Board Action on Human Resources Committee recommendation concerning Superintendent’s 2015-2016 School Year evaluation.Support

Written testimony was received and provided to the Board. The following is a listing of people who submitted written testimony before the testimony deadline.

Name
Organization
Agenda Item
Position
Alex Harris Harold Castle Foundation VII. B. Board Action on Human Resources Committee recommendation concerning Superintendent’s 2015-2016 School Year evaluation.Support
Lorey IshiharaDepartment of Education (Kahuku High and Intermediate)IV. A. SAC Report on: (1) standards-based education, including statewide assessmentComment
Kellee KellyDepartment of EducationIV. A. SAC Report on: (1) standards-based education, including statewide assessmentComment
Kris CoffieldIMUA AllianceIV. A. SAC Report on: (1) standards-based education, including statewide assessmentComment
Dr. Lisa Watkins-VictorinoNative Hawaiian education Council IV. A. SAC Report on: (2) presentation on student achievement centered items in the Department of Education’s proposed biennium budget for the 2017-2019 Fiscal BienniumComment
Dr. Lisa Watkins-VictorinoNative Hawaiian Education CouncilVII. B. Board Action on Human Resources Committee recommendation concerning Superintendent’s 2015-2016 School Year evaluation.Support
Karen LeeHawaii P-20VII. B. Board Action on Human Resources Committee recommendation concerning Superintendent’s 2015-2016 School Year evaluation.Support
Jessica WhitsettCommunity Member IV. A. SAC Report on: (1) standards-based education, including statewide assessmentComment
Debbie AndersonCommunity Member IV. A. SAC Report on: (1) standards-based education, including statewide assessmentComment
Ekekela AionaAha Punana LeoVII. B. Board Action on Human Resources Committee recommendation concerning Superintendent’s 2015-2016 School Year evaluation.Support

Karen Lee, Executive Director, Hawaii P-20, testified in support of Superintendent Kathryn Matayoshi’s evaluation. Lee stated that Matayoshi has worked extremely well with educational organizations in partnership. Lee gave examples of Matayoshi’s work, including dual credit programs, 21 prekindergarten classrooms, and an introduction of career readiness initiative. Lee stated that Matayoshi has contributed to better results for students.

Alex Harris, Senior Program Officer for Education, Harold K. L. Castle Foundation, testified in support of the Superintendent Matayoshi’s evaluation. Harris stated that Matayoshi is a great leader and noted that examples of her important contributions are included in his written testimony.

Andy Jones, Teacher, Radford High School, referred to his written testimony. Jones stated that students are not receiving key elements of a well-rounded education, and reclaiming principal-teacher autonomy is necessary. Jones compared private school and public school teaching schedules and stated that public schools could achieve the same educational excellence.

Vickie Parker Kam, Academic Growth Coach, Ilima Intermediate, testified that less than 5% of 4,140 colleges use the Smarter Balanced Assessment (“SBA”) for various things. Kam added that her daughters were a part of the Running Start program in 2006 and stated she is glad to see it expanding.

Lisa Morrison, Teacher, Maui Waena Intermediate, testified that the SBA is only used for college placement, not acceptance. Morrison highlighted that the Department of Education’s (“Department”) presentation on assessments provided at the Student Achievement Committee meeting, earlier the same day, referred to academic feedback and stated that the SBA does not provide feedback that informs instruction. Morrison stated that assessments create a fear-based compliance system that does not motivate students or teachers.

Jessica Whitsett, community member, testified on comments from the Student Achievement Committee meeting, which took place earlier that day. Whitsett stated that the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People now supports the movement to opt out of standardized testing.

Michal Nowiski, Teacher, University Laboratory Public Charter School, shared his experience teaching at a charter school that encourages a higher degree of autonomy. Nowiski stated that his students do not do test prep work yet still excel in assessments. Nowiski stated that the school has a unique curriculum, created by teachers, which involves music, arts, and other disciplines. Nowiski stated that teachers do not have to worry about evaluations and are very successful in the classroom.

Mireille Ellsworth, Teacher, Waiakea High School, testified that standardized testing does not reveal student achievement. Ellsworth stated the SBA is less valuable as a way to compare student achievement across states, as only 17 states are left in the consortium, and the State should consider offering its own test. Once the assessment is developed, the State would not have to continuously pay for it and could save money on things like computer hardware. Ellsworth stated that the federal Every Student Succeeds Act affords the opportunity to pilot an authentic assessment for the State.

Amy Perruso, Teacher, Mililani High School, testified that teachers are frustrated at the slow rate of change and expressed opinions about testing culture, Board Policy 202.4, and student learning objectives-linked teacher evaluations. Perruso stated that half of Hawaii's teachers will be subject to the evaluation in the current school year. Perruso added that that State is no longer required to have the SBA and urged the Board to support struggling schools.

Mitzie Higa, Hawaii State Teachers Association, testified on behalf of the organization’s president, Corey Rosenlee. Higa mentioned the Schools our Keiki Deserve initiative. Higa stated that teachers need more time to deal with their many responsibilities. Higa shared her experience with teacher autonomy.

Kris Coffield, Executive Director, IMUA Alliance, testified and asked the Board to consider revising its teacher evaluation policies. Coffield highlighted suggestions from his written testimony to empower teaching and shared the experience of a student he previously worked with.

Vanessa Ott, community member, testified that there is no clear definition of a “community member” and stated the term should refer to those interested in education and not belonging to any other stakeholder group. Ott also shared concerns regarding the Board community meetings. Ott stated that the notices should be more clear about the topics that will be discussed and expressed concern about community engagement discussions. Ott urged the Board to shift the paradigm from top-down and start with ground-up ideas.

Kau‘i Sang, parent, Anuenue School, testified in support of Superintendent Matayoshi’s evaluation. She clarified that while she is the Director of the Office of Hawaiian Education, she took vacation time to attend and testify at the meeting, so she is testifying in her capacity as a parent. Sang stated the current leadership style has shown evidence of positive change. Children continue to grow and have a difference of perspectives about teachers. Sang stated that the positive changes are due to work of the Board, Department, Superintendent, and other educational stakeholders.


III. Approval of Meeting Minutes of August 16, 2016

ACTION: Motion to approve the General Business Meeting minutes of August 16, 2016 (De Lima/Cox). The motion carried unanimously with all members present voting aye.


IV. Reports of Board Committees, Board Members, and Superintendent
Student Achievement Committee Vice Chairperson Margaret Cox stated that the Committee received a presentation on standards-based education, including statewide assessments. The item will be discussed further at a future committee meeting. The Committee was updated on student achievement-related items in the Department’s proposed biennium budget for discussion and transparency. The Department’s full proposed budget will be presented to the Board on October 4, 2016.



Board Vice Chairperson Brian De Lima stated that a good mix of participants attended the Hawaii County community meeting, and Superintendent Matayoshi was present with Department staff. Vice Chairperson De Lima shared that the community appreciated the attention to their specific geographic area.

Board Member Grant Chun reported that the Maui County community meeting had a lot of participation as well. Board Member Chun stated he circulated and listened to discussions in the various small groups. Board Member Chun shared that the mayor attended but was not clear on the goal of college and career readiness, which shows the complexity of the topic. Board Member Chun stated we should ensure that this goal is communicated clearly.

Board Member Bruce Voss stated that Superintendent Matayoshi and many principals attended the Kailua community meeting, but few parents did. Board Member Voss stated that it was a good experience with the chance to hear many valuable perspectives. Board Member Voss shared that although it can be difficult to include parents and the community, the Department is working hard to do so.

Board Member Kenneth Uemura stated that while the traffic was a mitigating factor (since the meeting was held in the same area that was impacted by an event where President Obama was speaking), the Manoa community meeting still had decent attendance. Board Member Uemura stated he focused on observing how the meeting was conducted and was impressed with the Department’s organization and speaking abilities.

Board Chairperson Mizumoto stated that it was a difficult decision to hold the meeting due to weather and traffic, but the attendance proved that deciding to hold the meeting was the right decision. Board Chairperson Mizumoto stated that there will be an additional meeting on September 8, 2016, in Aiea for those unable to attend the meeting in Manoa.

Board Member Bergin added that there will also be a meeting on September 7, 2016 in Hilo.

Superintendent Kathryn Matayoshi provided the Department’s Education Update and stated that four of Hawaii’s public school teachers received the Presidential Award for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching.






V. Discussion Items
Deputy Superintendent Stephen Schatz introduced Rodney Luke, Pearl City-Waipahu Complex Area Superintendent, and Keith Hayashi, Waipahu High School Principal.

Luke stated that the Waipahu complex has five elementary schools, one middle school, and one high school while the Pearl City complex has eight elementary schools, one middle school, and one high school. The two complexes have varied populations and demographics. Luke shared that, as classified by the Strive HI Performance System, there are three “Recognition” schools and 14 “Continuous Improvement” schools within the complex area. Luke showed a diagram and explained the complex area’s system it uses for success. Luke stated that each year, teachers discuss the upcoming school year. Due to the large size of the complex, Waipahu and Pearl City each had their own discussions. Luke shared the two-pronged approach for data, which includes three initiatives. ART institutes center conversations around student data and set targets for student achievement. Accreditation focuses on school improvement. Waipahu complex schools went through accreditation together for tighter transitions, and Pearl City complex schools are working towards doing the same. College and career readiness previously only looked at college strategies but has since expanded and looks at students through the journey of transition.

Board Member Grant Chun left at 2:31 p.m.

Hayashi stated that “My voice, my choice, my future” is Waipahu High School’s motto, which supports personalized learning communities for students. Teachers were asked to think about key qualities in potential employees and then brought those proficiencies to the classroom. Hayashi shared a table showing how students move through the system and support each other. There are focused pathways that help students find their passions – Arts & Communication, Academy of Natural Resources, Industrial & Engineering Technology, Business and Public & Human Services, and Academy of Health & Sciences. Hayashi shared a video featuring students from the Academy of Natural Resources.

Board Member Chun returned at 2:35 p.m.

Hayashi stated that school partners support the pathways and ask students what types of problems they wish to solve. The Early College program increases college and career readiness for students while maintaining rigorous academic standards. Hayashi shared data on the progression of classes offered in the program since its establishment in 2012. Hayashi plans to have students graduate with an associate’s degree by 2018. Hayashi stated that having access to college courses allows students to dream and change their lives. Hayashi plans to further expand the academies and listen to students to support them.

Board Member Voss asked Hayashi what he would like to see from the Board and Department to support Waipahu High School and other high schools. Hayashi stated that the Superintendent’s support has been important to clear the way and make the programs possible. Hayashi added that support from their CAS is helpful as well. The Department has been supportive in innovative efforts, such as working with student teachers.

Military Representative Colonel Peter Santa Ana stated that the high school is teaching all the necessary things for success. Santa Ana asked if the credits earned through the program are transferrable for students who move or attend college out-of-state. Hayashi stated that his understanding is that the credits are transferrable.

Board Member Cox asked if Hayashi or Luke have input regarding the complaints relating to over-testing. Hayashi stated that the opportunity for dialogue is important, and all stakeholders need to move forward together with student voice as a factor.

Board Member Minn stated that the presentation showed a good example of meeting the community’s needs and asked how struggling students are being addressed in the complex area. Luke stated that student achievement and attendance are monitored, and getting students in school and educating them will lead to success. Luke stated that strategies to best address each student are identified in the academies. Energy and effort are put forth to make contact with each student. Also, it is important to look at transition points as students move from elementary to middle and high school. Hayashi stated that high school students go back to their elementary and middle schools to share experiences. Hayashi stated that college readiness begins in elementary school.

Board Vice Chairperson De Lima appreciated the recognition that hard work starts in elementary school and stated the right message is being put forth by the complex area. Vice Chairperson De Lima asked what attention Waipahu High School gives to chronically absent students. Hayashi replied that the school has a small community concept, so students feel like there are people at the school that care. Hayashi stated that a system of support is beneficial for students. However, there are still students who do not show up to school despite efforts.

Board Vice Chairperson De Lima left at 3:20 p.m.

Karen Lee, Executive Director, Hawaii P-20, stated that the Running Start program has been active for 15 years and allows high school students to take courses at the University of Hawaii. The Jump Start program allows high school seniors to take Career and Technical Education courses to fulfill requirements as well. The Early College program provides college level classes on high school campuses. Lee stated that students taking dual credits are more likely to attend college and remain in college past the first year. Lee shared data showing the positive effects of dual credit programs and highlighted the importance of the partnership between the Department and University of Hawaii. Funding from various sources help Hawaii P-20 succeed. The state general fund money from Weighted Student Formula (school funds) pays for students in Jump Start, and the Harold K. L. Castle Foundation and other private funders have funded the Early College program. An Early College task force was formed in 2014 with various stakeholders to shape the program.

Board Vice Chairperson De Lima returned at 3:23 p.m.

Board Member Bergin asked if the dual credit opportunities are available for charter school students. Lee stated that Hawaii P-20 just recently started pursuing charter school opportunities. Board Member Bergin asked if charter schools should contact Hawaii P-20 if they are interested in the programs. Lee replied affirmatively and noted that charter school participation is contingent on available funding.

Board Member Voss stated that the dual credit programs clearly have a positive impact on the achievement gap data and finding a sustainable source of funding for the programs is key. Board Member Voss asked how the Board can help Hawaii P-20 convince other private foundations to get involved. Lee replied that based on early outcomes, private foundations are interested, and Hawaii P-20 would like to have the Board speak on behalf of the students.
Marie Okinaka, Project Specialist, Hawaii State Public Library System, provided an overview of the 2016 Summer Reading Program. Okinaka shared that minutes read were used as a measurement to track reading instead of the number of books read. There was a system-wide tracking methodology with rewards for participants. Readers who completed four or more weeks of the program were rewarded with free books. Individual guides for each age group were distributed to explain recent program changes, how to participate, and provide a tracking log for readers. Okinaka stated that 61% of those who signed up participated for four weeks or more. Okinaka shared a participation graph and stated that there were 15,800 members reading 18 million minutes all together. A patron survey showed that the program encouraged 78% of youth participants to read more. Okinaka stated that next year’s Summer Reading Program will be more flexible with an easier point system and online tracking process. There is also the possibility of expanding the program to a year-round system. Okinaka stated that the Hawaii State Public Library System (“HSPLS”) would like to get more teenagers involved in the program and will work closely with community partners to further expand the program. Stacey Aldrich, State Librarian, stated that free books had been a good incentive for the program, and HSPLS is in the process of testing an online system for year-round reading.

Aldrich stated that she had visited all 50 library branches in the state and decided to commission a staffing study for improvements. The services across libraries are not equal. A staffing consultant analyzed library staff and provided tools to build strategies. Aldrich stated that there is a need to revisit position descriptions and streamline the material handling process. It is challenging to provide equal services across six islands with varied communities. The consultant provided recommendations for improvement, including a tool to see hours of vacation time and services. A crosswalk was used to compare Hawaii’s services to those of the King County System in Washington State. Aldrich stated that a matrix will be used to compare branches and address staffing issues. A workflow study will review branch processes to learn and implement evenly across the system. Aldrich is looking at new models for learning opportunities and stated that the study will give a better idea of how to creatively serve the public.

Aldrich shared HSPLS’s new website with multiple ways to navigate and a focus on user stories. The website provides over three million items to easily access, including events, learning databases, free programs, and more. The new site will create discoverability and a connection across communities.


VI. Public Testimony on Board Agenda Items

Board Chairperson Mizumoto called for public testimony. There was no public testimony at this time.

VII. Action Items
Board Chairperson Mizumoto stated that the investigative committee provided its report and recommendations at the Board’s last general business meeting.

ACTION: Motion to approve the recommendations as described in the investigative committee’s report dated August 16, 2016 (De Lima/Minn). The motion carried unanimously with all members present voting aye.

ACTION: Motion to adopt the on Human Resources Committee’s recommendation to adopt the Superintendent’s 2015-2016 School Year evaluation (Human Resources Committee/no second required). The motion carried unanimously with all members present voting aye.


VIII. Adjournment

Board Chairperson Mizumoto adjourned the meeting at 3:57 p.m.