FINAL

STATE OF HAWAII
BOARD OF EDUCATION
GENERAL BUSINESS MEETING

MINUTES

Queen Liliuokalani Building
1390 Miller Street, Room 404
Honolulu, Hawaii 96813
Tuesday, May 3, 2016
1:30 p.m.


PRESENT:
Lance Mizumoto, Chairperson
Brian De Lima, Esq., Vice Chairperson
Amy Asselbaye
Grant Chun, Esq.
Margaret Cox
Patricia Halagao
Donald Horner
Hubert Minn
Jim Williams
Colonel Dawn Suitor, Military Representative

EXCUSED:
Brennan Lee, Student Representative

ALSO PRESENT:
Stephen Schatz, Deputy Superintendent
Gary Suganuma, Deputy Attorney General, Department of the Attorney General
Siobhan Ng, Acting Chief of Staff to the Superintendent
Alison Kunishige, Executive Director
Kenyon Tam
Summer Jenkins







I. Call to Order

The Board of Education (“Board”) General Business Meeting was called to order by Board Chairperson Lance Mizumoto at 1:45 p.m.

II. Public Testimony on Board of Education (“Board”) Agenda Items

Chairperson Mizumoto called for public testimony. The following people provided oral testimony.

Name
Organization
Agenda Item
Position
Cheri NakamuraHE‘E CoalitionVII. C. Board Action on Student Achievement Committee recommendation concerning proposed new Student Health Services PolicySupport
Hinaleimoana Wong-KaluKumu Hina Team N/AN/A
Joe Wilson Kumu Hina Team N/AN/A
Corey RosenleeHawaii State Teachers AssociationVII. D. Board Action on Student Achievement Committee Action concerning Board policiesComments
Camaron MiyamotoKumu Hina Team N/AN/A
Dean HamerKumu Hina Team N/AN/A
Maddalynn SesepaiweKumu Hina Team N/AN/A

Written Testimony was received and provided to the Board Members. The following is a listing of people that submitted written testimony before the testimony deadline.

Name
Organization
Agenda Item
Position
Dede MamiyaMorihara Lau &
Fong LLP
VII. F. Board Action on appointment of
four individuals to serve as members
of the Hawaii Stated Public Charter
School Commission
Support (Hussey)
Lisa Watkins-VictorinoNative Hawaiian
Education Council
VII. F. Board Action on appointment of
four individuals to serve as members
of the Hawaii Stated Public Charter
School Commission
Support (Hussey)
Kamanaopono CrabbeOffice of Hawaiian AffairsVII. F. Board Action on appointment of
four individuals to serve as members
of the Hawaii Stated Public Charter
School Commission
Support (Krug)
Kamanaopono Crabbe
Office of Hawaiian Affairs
VII. F. Board Action on appointment of
four individuals to serve as members
of the Hawaii Stated Public Charter
School Commission
Support (Hussey)
M. Ekekela AionaAha Punana LeoVII. F. Board Action on appointment of
four individuals to serve as members
of the Hawaii Stated Public Charter
School Commission
Support (Krug)
Ka'ulani PahioNa Lei NaauaoVII. F. Board Action on appointment of
four individuals to serve as members
of the Hawaii Stated Public Charter
School Commission
Support (all)

Cheri Nakamura, Director, HE‘E Coalition, testified in support of Board Policy 103.4, School Health Services. Nakamura was impressed by the number of stakeholders collaborating to develop a policy with a framework to support students. Nakamura supported the policy on behalf of HE‘E Coalition and encouraged the Board to do so as well.

Hinaleimoana Wong-Kalu, Community Leader, Kumu Hina Team, testified and described her film and organization to the Board. Wong-Kalu presented a petition of 5,000 signatures asking that the Board ensure respect and protection be afforded to all transgender students of Hawaii. Wong-Kalu asked the Board to consider setting consistent guidelines for treating students fairly, regardless of their gender and a provision made for training to implement fair treatment for students and judicious action be taken so that all students can engage in activities with respect and aloha. Wong-Kalu informed the Board that her media team is prepared to offer support in any way necessary to help Hawaii’s youth.

Board Member Patricia Halagao assured Wong-Kalu that the June 7, 2016 Student Achievement Committee meeting would address transgender issues in schools.

Joe Wilson, Kumu Hina Team, testified and asked the Board to provide the supports necessary and help teachers be prepared to handle transgender situations in the classroom. Wilson echoed that through the Kumu Hina Team’s work, he has recognized Hawaii as rich with the tradition of transgender inclusion.

Corey Rosenlee, President, Hawaii State Teachers Association, stated that his organization is proud to sponsor the Kumu Hina Team. Rosenlee then testified on the issue of class size in Hawaii’s public schools and stated that more data is needed to analyze the situation. Rosenlee stated that the School Status and Improvement Report is used currently, but it is important to know how many teachers are actually in classrooms. Rosenlee suggested separating special education from general education for more accurate data and asked that the Department of Education (“Department”) solve the problem of large class sizes.

Camaron Miyamoto, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Intersex Student Services, University of Hawaii, testified in support of the Kumu Hina Team. Miyamoto referenced Title IX and shared concern over the power of the principal to decide whether protection against sex discrimination will be enforced. Miyamoto stated that Hawaii’s teachers care and need training. Miyamoto added that there is an opportunity for the Board to work with the Kumu Hina Team to join efforts and support all gendered students.

Dean Hamer, Kumu Hina Team, apologized to the Board for discussing an issue not on the agenda and thanked the Board for taking the courageous stance to protect all students and explained that the Kumu Hina Project began with a documentary, which evolved into a film, and now is a way to educate the population about transgender students. Hamer stated that he would like to see Hawaii’s transgender population be part of the Board’s process.

Maddalynn Sesepaiwe testified that she has three children and cannot imagine them experiencing situations that are currently happening in the school system. Sesepaswe suggested the Department implement culture competency training to help support transgender students.

III. Approval of Meeting Minutes of April 19, 2016

ACTION: Motion to approve the General Business Meeting minutes of April 19, 2016 (De Lima/Halagao). The motion carried unanimously with all members present voting aye.

IV. Reports of Board Committees, Board Members, and Superintendent
Audit Committee Vice Chairperson Donald Horner reported that the Committee received financial report presentations and decided that future reports would be approved by the Board.

Student Achievement Committee Chairperson Patricia Halagao reported that the Committee received an update on Policy 105.15, Seal of Biliteracy, an update on competency based education, and an update on future policies to be discussed in June with ends policies to be added. The Committee also had thorough discussion and took action on a number of student related policies.

Stephen Schatz, Deputy Superintendent, congratulated Waimea High School Principal Mahina Anguay and Kapolei Middle School Principal Bruce Naguwa for receiving awards. Schatz shared his experience visiting Waimea High, stating that he had been inspired by the community and Waimea High’s recognition on the College and Career Readiness Index. Schatz reported that the Department is in the process of expanding the Community Eligibility Program and updated the Board on the Presidential Scholars Program, in which seven of the 10 Hawaii semi-finalists are from public schools.

V. Discussion Items

Schatz introduced a new segment for Board meetings called “Bright Spots.” He stated that it is an exciting moment to be able to share success stories in the field. Schatz shared that he is continually impressed by what teachers and leaders are doing for students, and the public should be informed about good things going on in schools. Schatz added that the Department uses “bright spots” to scale success as well. Various learning networks have been used to facilitate dialogue among leaders. Schatz introduced Hilo-Waiakea Complex Area Superintendent Brad Bennett and invited him to speak.

Bennett stated that he would share two bright spots: the Early College Program at Waiakea High School and the Hilo-Waiakea Complex Area Alaka‘i Initiative.

Kelsey Koga, Principal, Waiakea High School, stated that the high school started a program for early college courses and the opportunity to attain dual credits. Koga stated that the program is compelling because it targets non-traditional students who would otherwise not be expected to seek extra credits. Koga introduced Andrew Frias, VISTA Coordinator, and two students from the program, Cecily Poai, a junior, and Cody Cuba, a senior.

Frias stated that in the Early College Program, they teach students to be prosumers, which he defined as individuals who go beyond consuming and contribute to the synergy. Frias showed a video of Waiakea High School and explained that 44% of the population is Native Hawaiian and has a high population that qualifies for Free and Reduced Lunch. The program targets Native Hawaiians, children of color, and Free and Reduced Lunch candidates.

Poai stated that when a student enters the Early College Program, he or she begins with four sequenced courses to learn the skills necessary to succeed. After the courses are completed, the student will enter the Running Start Program.

Frias stated that community excursions help students to figure out what fits for them. The program focuses on curriculum, careers, and the community, and focuses on students’ individual visions of success.

Poai shared her personal experience with the program. Poai plans to take additional classes over the summer break and anticipates graduating with 47 college credits. Poai explained her siblings had not been successful in college on the mainland, which motivated her to succeed. Poai had the opportunity to join the program and received help finding a path that fulfilled her desires. Poai stated that she wants to major in sociology and find employment as a social worker. Poai is only half of a credit away from being eligible to graduate high school as a junior.

Cuba shared he earned 15 credits through the program by doubling his work load in his senior year. Cuba stated that he plans to graduate with 21 college credits. Cuba shared that he experienced a difficult childhood and struggled with school during his early high school years. Cuba stated that the college program allowed him to prioritize his time and improved his cumulative grade point average. Through the program, Cuba had the opportunity to tour a variety of colleges on the mainland. Cuba stated that he applied for to the college he was most impressed by and was accepted to attend in the fall of 2016.

Frias presented a graph comparing the program’s 2015 and 2016 graduates’ plans for higher education. The majority of 2015 graduates stayed in Hawaii after graduating from high school, but the majority of 2016 graduates plan to attend mainland schools. Frias stated that the courses instill confidence in students to leave the island. Frias stated that he anticipates even more progress for 2017.

Board Member Jim Williams asked Cuba if the college he will be attending will be accepting all of his credits. Cuba responded that the school will be accepting his credits. Board Member Williams stated that the acceptance of credits is a testament to the rigorous courses offered by the program.

Board Member Horner stated that Poai’s ability to graduate high school with 42 college credits shows a substantial financial investment. Board Member Horner recognized the program’s opportunity for students to reduce college fees by earning credits in high school.

Frias explained that the program is funded through Title I scholarships from Gear UP, a $10,000 grant from Hawaii Community Foundation, and tuition waivers from Hawaii Community College, and the Harold K. L. Castle Foundation also provided another grant. Frias stated that in the third year, the school will have to pay 30% of student’s tuition and books, which will be difficult.

Board Member Minn stated he would like to use these kinds of examples to help build the strategic plan and asked the difference between the program and high school classes. Cuba responded that high school courses are basic whereas the program’s courses go deeper into the subject matter. Poai stated that the program is very rigorous because students are expected to fit a year of high school work into one college semester. Poai stated that the success rate of students is much higher because of the resources around them and mentioned that there is a tutoring program to help students keep up with their assignments.

Board Member Minn asked the principal if success has motivated other students at Waiakea High School. Koga stated that exposure of the program motivates and focuses on students that plan to stay in Hilo and cultivate the community. Board Member Minn stated that the program is a great example of empowerment from a Complex Area Superintendent.

Board Member Cox asked the students to describe a typical school week. Poai stated that she takes her college course on Mondays and Wednesdays after high school. The course is from 2:00-3:15 p.m. Poai stated that the work for her college English 100 course is equivalent to five high school classes. Cuba stated he attends college courses after high school Monday through Thursday. Cuba added that the schedule helps him to prioritize his time.

Schatz recognized the program’s dramatic results and stated that it is a good example of more students preparing for college. Schatz directed attention to the topic of leadership recruitment on the neighbor islands. Schatz stated that it is difficult to fill the positions, so Bennett took action to create a local leadership pipeline for his complex area. Bennett was accompanied by Darren Nakoba, School Specialist.

Bennett stated his approach to improve preparedness for leaders in the complex area involved all levels. Bennett stated that eight competencies were established through principal discussions, and the program was developed around the established competencies. Teacher-leaders were selected by principals to be a part of the program and meet once a month to get leadership exposure and understand the importance of strong teachers at the school level. Bennett shared a video of teacher-leaders and their experience with the program. Bennett had the leaders share their fears to break the group open and become one entity. The leaders developed a definition of an effective leader at Waiakea High. Bennett distributed a document with a matrix with the characteristics of an effective leader. Future teachers will be chosen using the matrix, and current teachers will become mentors in the program.

Board Member Williams asked Bennett how teachers were recruited. Bennett explained that, at first, principals strongly encouraged teachers to join the program. However, the teachers later saw the value of participating. Substitutes were hired to accommodate teachers in the program. Two teachers per school were chosen.

Board Member Horner stated that the program will benefit the area with teacher retention. Board Member Horner stated that affirming the skill sets of leaders is important.

Bennett stated that having the Complex Area Superintendent work with the leaders makes them feel valued.

Board Member Halagao provided an introduction for Elisapeta Tuupo-Alaimaleata, Founder, Le Fetuao Samoan Language Center (“Le Fetuao”). Board Member Halagao met Tuupo-Alaimaleata while working on the Seal of Biliteracy and saw Le Fetuao as a model. Board Member Halagao attended a Le Fetuao session and witnessed children learning language and culture. The organization has received national grants and is helping the Samoan population in schools.

Tuupo-Alaimaleata stated that Le Fetuao is the only existing language center in the United States, and the center supports the Seal of Biliteracy and Multilingualism Board policies. Tuupo-Alaimaleata stated that Le Fetuao is a resource that supplements efforts of the Department and emphasized the importance of the partnership. The language center started in 2008 with no funding, and with the help of volunteers, grew from one to five language classes, which are now to provide to parents as well as students.

Tuupo-Alaimaleata recognized her partner Samuel Hakide, a graduate student from the University of Hawaii, who worked with Board Member Halagao in her multilingual efforts.

Tuupo-Alaimaleata stated that administrators need to understand their students to provide an effective learning experience. Le Fetuao provides a different aspect for students to identify with and aims to develop the whole child through academic growth, social well-being, and psychological maturation. Le Fetuao has three centers on Oahu serving over 60 children in the main center. Children from ages five to 16 are provided services. Tuupo-Alaimaleata stated that a language council was developed last year to work with community leaders and make an effort to support education. Le Fetuao provides the opportunity for learning outside of the classroom and center’s model creates academic support, early childhood education opportunities, spiritual guidance, and cultural, social, psychological, and technological supports. Le Fetuao received funding from the Administration for Native Americans in 2013 and has recently submitted a grant proposal to create authors and continue to provide activities involving technology, arts, music, history, culture, and community involvement. Tuupo-Alaimaleata asked that the Department collaborate with the centers and stated that finding space to offer the programs is a challenge. Tuupo-Alaimaleata explained that a community church had been used to house the program for the past five years, but the organization has now been asked to pay rent for the space. Tuupo-Alaimaleata asked that the Board and Department help provide support for the program.

Board Member Halagao stated that she will work to help support the program.

Board Chairperson Mizumoto stated that the Board would like to provide some support if possible.

VI. Public Testimony on Board Agenda Items

Board Chairperson Mizumoto called for public testimony. There was no public testimony at this time.

VII. Action Items

Sean Bacon and Aloha Dayton, Personnel Specialists, Office of Human Resources, presented the request for exceptions to collective bargaining agreements. Bacon explained that the “two + two” process (the process used where a committee comprised of two Board members and two representatives from the unions review requests for waivers and exceptions) was used to review the requests and they were presenting on five requests.

The Department met with the Hawaii State Teachers Association and Hawaii Government Employees Association to get their input and approval on the requests. All parties agreed upon all requests with the exception of Waiakea Intermediate’s request to reduce instructional time. The unions agreed to the request; however, the Department did not support the exception and feels that students need to be on campus for the minimum of 1,800 minutes per week. The Department spoke with the Complex Area Superintendent who agreed to work with the school on alternative solutions.

Board Member Williams asked what distinguishes Waiakea Intermediate’s request from the other exceptions for time reductions. Bacon responded that the difference is that Waiakea Intermediate’s request does not meet the 1,800 minute requirement.

Motion (main) to approve the School Community Council requests for exceptions to collective bargaining agreements, statutory waivers, and waivers of Board policy for Kailua High School (to implement a bell schedule that includes 1,295 minutes a week of teacher instructional time), Ke Kula O Ehunuikaimalino School (to allow the senior project and 4.0 credits of Hawaiian language to be required for graduation), and Niu Valley Middle School (to implement a bell schedule that includes 215 minutes of student instructional time on four selected days) and deny the School Community Council request for exceptions for Waiakea Intermediate School (to implement a bell schedule that includes 1,731 minutes of student learning time weekly), as described in the Department memoranda dated May 3, 2016 (De Lima/Horner).

Board Member Asselbaye expressed concerned about reducing Niu Valley Middle’s instructional time. Bacon explained that instruction would end early once per quarter for the International Baccalaureate Program versus once every week, like Waiakea Intermediate’s request. Board Member Asselbaye questioned why it was necessary to reduce instructional time for Niu Valley Middle when no other schools offering the International Baccalaureate Program (which are in the same complex area) are asking for an exception.

Board Vice Chairperson Brian De Lima suggested separating the Niu Valley Middle request from the current motion so that the motion on the floor can be approved.

Action: Motion to amend the main motion by removing the School Community Council (“SCC”) requests for exceptions for Niu Valley Middle School (De Lima/Horner). The motion carried with all members present voting aye.

Board Member Minn asked for the purpose of the reduced instructional time for Waiakea Intermediate. Bacon replied that the reduction is for additional professional development and meeting time for teachers without students on campus.

Board Member Halagao stated that 69 minutes a week for additional planning is extensive and wondered if the planning would make instructional time more effective.
Board Vice Chairperson De Lima stated that Waiakea Intermediate has a good principal and the request has merit. Bacon stated that exceptions are only agreed upon for extraordinary circumstances.

Board Member Williams stated that the Complex Area Superintendent indicated they would work with Waiakea Intermediate’s principal. Board Member Williams stated that if extraordinary circumstances are found, they could ask the Board to reconsider.

ACTION: Motion to approve the School Community Council requests for exceptions to collective bargaining agreements, statutory waivers, and waivers of Board policy for Kailua High School (to implement a bell schedule that includes 1,295 minutes a week of teacher instructional time) and Ke Kula O Ehunuikaimalino School (to allow the senior project and 4.0 credits of Hawaiian language to be required for graduation) and deny the School Community Council request for exceptions for Waiakea Intermediate School (to implement a bell schedule that includes 1,731 minutes of student learning time weekly), as described in the Department memoranda dated May 3, 2016 (De Lima/Horner). The motion carried with De Lima, Asselbaye, Chun, Cox, Horner, and Williams voting aye, and Halagao and Minn voting nay.

Board Member Asselbaye stated that the Board should reject the request for Niu Valley Middle and the SCC can return to the Board for reconsideration if it needs to.

Schatz stated that rejected waivers are part of the process, and there must be a line drawn between what is acceptable and what is not.

Board Vice Chairperson De Lima agreed with Board Member Asselbaye but stated he may reconsider if the school has a special characteristic to which the request caters.

Board Member Cox stated that if the process is difficult, the school must have a sufficient reason to request the waiver. Board Member Cox pointed out that the instructional time would only be shortened four times a year and recommended to pass the waiver.

Board Member Minn stated that assumptions were being made without hearing more information from the school’s principal.

Board Member Chun provided some context on the review process for new members and stated that other schools may have similar pending requests.

Board Member Horner stated that when the Board is unsure, it is best to give authority to principals. Schatz agreed that the default is to give authority to the principals but a line must be drawn at a certain point. Schatz stated that he thinks the request is reasonable.

Board Member Williams mentioned that the memo shows the Board approved the wavier in the previous year. Board Member Williams stated that considering the reduction is only four days, he supports it.

Board Member Asselbaye stated that because the whole complex has a grant to articulate the International Baccalaureate Program, the Board may potentially see waivers from all schools in the complex. Board Member Asselbaye added that, historically, substitutes are hired to teach while instructors articulate.

ACTION: Motion to approve the School Community Council request for exceptions to collective bargaining agreements, statutory waivers, and waivers of Board policy for Niu Valley Middle School (to implement a bell schedule that includes 215 minutes of student instructional time on four selected days), as described in the Department memorandum dated May 3, 2016 (Cox/Horner). The motion carried with De Lima, Chun, Cox, Halagao, Minn, and Williams voting aye, and Asselbaye voting nay.

ACTION: Motion to publicly release the Department of the Attorney General’s review of the Department of Education’s Department Directed Leave and Leave Pending Investigation process and procedures (Human Resources Committee/no second required). The motion carried with all members present voting aye.

Note: The Board took agenda item VII.C. (Board Action on appointment of four individuals to serve as members of the State Public Charter School Commission) out of order before the agenda item below.

Student Achievement Committee Chairperson Halagao reported on the recommendations regarding a new student health services policy, which was considered by the committee earlier the same day.

ACTION: Motion to:
Board Member Cox left the room at 3:47 p.m.


Student Achievement Committee Chairperson Halagao presented the Committee’s recommendations concerning the following policies:

Policy Number
Policy Title
Revisions
101.3Student Activities ProgramAdopt as described in the submittal dated May 3, 2016
101.11SurfingNo action (policy deferred)
102.8Student Promotion Adopt as described in the submittal dated May 3, 2016
102.9Middle Level Education PromotionNo action (policy deferred)
102.12Assessing/Grading Student Performance(4501) and Reporting Student Progress (4510)Adopt as described in the submittal dated May 3, 2016 with additional revisions:
o delete the last sentence in the second to the last paragraph
103.1Health and WellnessNo action (policy deferred)
105.5Gifted and TalentedAdopt as described in the submittal dated May 3, 2016
105.6Career and Technical Education Adopt as described in the submittal dated May 3, 2016
105.10Programs and Services for Secondary Alienated/At-Risk Students Adopt as described in the submittal dated May 3, 2016
105.12Special Education and Related ServicesAdopt as described in the submittal dated May 3, 2016 with additional revisions:
o add a new #4 stating “provide appropriate instructional resources, planning time, and support staff to meet the individual needs of students”
105.13InclusionAdopt as described in the submittal dated May 3, 2016
106.2Class SizeAdopt as described in the submittal dated May 3, 2016
106.3Admission and Attendance (4145) and Compulsory School Attendance (4140)Adopt as described in the submittal dated May 3, 2016

ACTION: Motion to approve the Student Achievement Committee’s recommendations as described in the table above (Student Achievement Committee/no second required). The motion carried unanimously with all members present voting aye.

Student Achievement Committee Vice Chairperson Williams clarified that the committee notified the Board that certain policies were deferred and that this was for information purposes only; the deferrals were not included in the committee’s recommendation for action.

Board Member Williams reviewed the memo with the Charter School Permitted Interaction Group (“Investigative Committee’s”) recommendations concerning the State Public Charter School Commission (“Commission”). Board Member Williams directed Board Members’ attention to page four of a revised proposed special review process that was circulated, showing changes from the Investigative Committee’s recommendations presented at the April 19, 2016 General Business Meeting. He stated that these revisions were based on advice from the Department of the Attorney General regarding the Board’s authority to suspend approval of new charter schools.

ACTION: Motion to approve the revised special review process as amended (Williams/ Minn). The motion carried unanimously with all members present voting aye.

Note: The Board took this agenda item out of order before agenda item VII.C. (Board Action on Student Achievement Committee recommendation concerning proposed new Student Health Services Policy)

ACTION: Motion to appoint Sylvia Hussey to serve as a member of the Hawaii State Public Charter School Commission for the remainder of the term expiring June 30, 2016 and a subsequent three-year term ending June 30, 2019 (De Lima/Horner). The motion carried unanimously with all members present voting aye.

ACTION: Motion to reappoint Mitch D’Olier to serve as a member of the Hawaii State Public Charter School Commission for another three-year term effective July 1, 2016 and ending June 30, 2016 (De Lima/Horner). The motion carried unanimously with all members present voting aye.

Board Vice Chairperson De Lima stated that the Board’s Charter School PIG would like to have a meeting. D’Olier stated that the Commission’s permitted interaction group would like to meet and figure out how to share bright spots in charter schools.

Board Chairperson Mizumoto stated that he spoke with Catherine Payne, Commission Chairperson, about being on the Board’s agenda regularly.

Board Chairperson Mizumoto invited Hussey to speak. Hussey thanked the Board for confirming her position.

Board Member Williams requested that the new members go into their roles with the idea that charter schools are good and without any assumption that they need to be “cleaned up.”

Board Member Minn thanked Hussey for accepting the position and hoped the Board and Commission would take the opportunity to bring charter schools into the system.

ACTION: Motion to reappoint Kalehua Krug to serve as a member of the Hawaii State Public Charter School Commission for another three-year term effective July 1, 2016 and ending June 30, 2019 (De Lima/Horner). The motion carried unanimously with all members present voting aye.

Board Member Williams asked how one nominee was favored over the other for the last slot. Board Chairperson Mizumoto explained that John Kim is more qualified given his experience and knowledge of charter schools and is a better fit.

ACTION: Motion to approve John Kim to serve as a member of the Hawaii State Public Charter School Commission for the remainder of the term expiring June 30, 2017 (De Lima/Horner). The motion carried unanimously with all members present voting aye.

Board Chairperson Mizumoto reviewed the memorandum stating that in the interest of board governance, the Board staff would report directly to the Board.

ACTION: Motion to approve the Memorandum of Understanding regarding the Board Support Office, as attached to Board Chairperson Mizumoto’s memorandum dated May 3, 2016 (De Lima/Asselbaye). The motion carried unanimously with all members present voting aye.

Board Chairperson Mizumoto mentioned that he had been approached about entering into a memorandum of understanding with Kamehameha Schools. No language has been drafted yet, but this would likely be presented to the Board soon.

VIII. Executive Session

ACTION: Motion to move into executive session to deliberate on matters concerning the authority of persons designated by the Board to conduct labor negotiations and to consult with the Board’s attorney on items on the agenda (De Lima/Horner). The motion carried unanimously with all members present voting aye.

The meeting recessed at 3:38 p.m. and reconvened at 4:26 p.m.

IX. Adjournment

Board Chairperson Mizumoto adjourned the meeting at 4:26 p.m.